Pop Goes The Country Vol. 23: Marty Robbins – “Don’t Worry” (1961)

Pop Goes The Country is an ongoing series where I explore country music’s biggest crossover hits At this point in this series, we’ve already covered Marty Robbins in fairly good detail. As the music industry tried to figure out how they could catch up with rockabilly in terms of targeting teenagers, they found at least… Read More Pop Goes The Country Vol. 23: Marty Robbins – “Don’t Worry” (1961)

Pop Goes The Country Vol. 22: Jim Reeves – “He’ll Have To Go” (1959)

Pop Goes The Country is an ongoing series where I explore country music’s biggest crossover hits. After spending a few weeks talking about the “saga song,” it’s time to shift back to everyone’s favorite topic in country music – the debate between what is and isn’t “country.” To give a quick recap with previous editions… Read More Pop Goes The Country Vol. 22: Jim Reeves – “He’ll Have To Go” (1959)

Pop Goes The Country Vol. 21: Johnny Horton – “The Battle Of New Orleans” (1959)

Pop Goes The Country is an ongoing series where I explore country music’s biggest crossover hits. If you’ve kept up with this series, you know that we’re currently discussing the rage of saga songs on ‘Pop Goes The Country.’ Thus far, we’ve discussed how they came to be and their popularity, but we haven’t discussed… Read More Pop Goes The Country Vol. 21: Johnny Horton – “The Battle Of New Orleans” (1959)

Pop Goes The Country Vol. 20: Stonewall Jackson – “Waterloo” (1959)

Pop Goes The Country is an ongoing series where I explore country music’s biggest crossover hits. Last time on ‘Pop Goes The Country,’ we discussed the advent of “saga songs” in the country music format. In short, they were story songs that stretched the limits of imagination, or, in some instances, put a new spin… Read More Pop Goes The Country Vol. 20: Stonewall Jackson – “Waterloo” (1959)

Pop Goes The Country Vol. 19: Marty Robbins – “El Paso” (1959)

Pop Goes The Country is an ongoing series where I explore country music’s biggest crossover hits. When we last discussed Marty Robbins on ‘Pop Goes The Country,’ we looked at his foray into teenage love songs with “A White Sport Coat.” But as previously mentioned in that piece, Robbins was one of the most versatile… Read More Pop Goes The Country Vol. 19: Marty Robbins – “El Paso” (1959)

Pop Goes The Country Vol. 14: Ferlin Husky – “Gone” (1957)

Pop Goes The Country is an ongoing series where I explore country music’s biggest crossover hits For the past several volumes of this series, we’ve explored the rockabilly movement in great detail. From country artists needing to adapt for survival purposes to artists moving in from the outside, while the crossover hits happened, country music,… Read More Pop Goes The Country Vol. 14: Ferlin Husky – “Gone” (1957)

Pop Goes The Country Double Feature: Jerry Lee Lewis – “The Killer” Within

Pop Goes The Country is an ongoing series where I explore country music’s biggest crossover hits. To continue from where we left off on the last edition of ‘Pop Goes The Country,’ we’re in the process of discussing the rockabilly movement from the rockabilly artist’s perspective. Thus far, all discussions of this movement have circled… Read More Pop Goes The Country Double Feature: Jerry Lee Lewis – “The Killer” Within

Pop Goes The Country Vol. 11: Carl Perkins – “Blue Suede Shoes” (1956)

Pop Goes The Country is an ongoing feature where I discuss country music’s biggest crossover hits. As previously mentioned, we’re in the rockabilly era of ‘Pop Goes The Country.’ Thus far, while we’ve discussed how certain country singers like Sonny James and Marty Robbins adapted nicely to this new trend, we’re now going to look… Read More Pop Goes The Country Vol. 11: Carl Perkins – “Blue Suede Shoes” (1956)

Pop Goes The Country Vol. 10: Marty Robbins – “A White Sport Coat” (1957)

Pop Goes The Country is an ongoing feature where I explore country music’s biggest crossover hits Last week on ‘Pop Goes The Country,’ we explored the beginning of the rockabilly movement and its effects on country music. The next few volumes of this series will be split between talking about big rockabilly numbers and big… Read More Pop Goes The Country Vol. 10: Marty Robbins – “A White Sport Coat” (1957)

Pop Goes The Country Vol. 9: Sonny James – “Young Love” (1956)

Pop Goes The Country is an ongoing feature where I explore country music’s biggest crossover hits. After weeks of discussing cowboys, boogie tunes, war and government conspiracies, it’s time to move on to something else with this feature. Considering this feature is meant to explore country music’s biggest crossover hits, it should come as no… Read More Pop Goes The Country Vol. 9: Sonny James – “Young Love” (1956)

Pop Goes The Country Vol. 8: Tennessee Ernie Ford – “Sixteen Tons” (1955)

Pop Goes The Country is an ongoing feature where I explore country music’s biggest crossover hits. It’s no secret that country music’s reliance on authenticity and story-telling is one of its richest qualities. Even if one can’t directly relate to drinking their life away or whatever other sad topic country music touches, there’s still value… Read More Pop Goes The Country Vol. 8: Tennessee Ernie Ford – “Sixteen Tons” (1955)

Pop Goes The Country Vol. 7: Jean Shepard & Ferlin Husky – “A Dear John Letter” (1953)

Pop Goes The Country is an ongoing feature where I explore country music’s biggest crossover hits. Thus far, with the exception of maybe Tex Williams’ “Smoke! Smoke! Smoke! (That Cigarette),” the crossover hits discussed in this feature have rarely reflected their respective time periods. In other words, in wasn’t what the song said that catapulted… Read More Pop Goes The Country Vol. 7: Jean Shepard & Ferlin Husky – “A Dear John Letter” (1953)

Pop Goes The Country Vol. 6: Pee Wee King – “Slow Poke” (1951)

Pop Goes The Country is an ongoing feature where I explore country music’s biggest crossover hits. When I said in volume four of this feature that I wouldn’t have a lot to say about every single crossover hit, little did I know what awaited me in volume six. After weeks of researching this particular volume… Read More Pop Goes The Country Vol. 6: Pee Wee King – “Slow Poke” (1951)